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Yes, a physio can help arthritis. There is a lot a physiotherapist can do to help people who are suffering from arthritis, and this post will explain how.

One of the main functions of physio for arthritis is pain management. There are many different types of arthritis so therefore there are a lot of different ways physio can help arthritis to manage symptoms such as joint pain, fatigue, swelling, etc. 

Physio For Arthritis Dublin Physio & Chiropractic

Physio For Managing Arthritis

Physiotherapy treatment has been shown to improve strength and function which helps arthritis sufferers to recover and maintain remission or resolution of symptoms long-term.

Additionally, physio for arthritis can help you to manage your arthritis better with exercise so that you can stay as healthy and active as possible. Remember movement and balance are key to the management and prevention of any condition. Many physiotherapists prescribe a treatment tailored specifically towards each client they see, i.e client-based care because everyone’s journey is different.

Physio For Arthritis Dublin Physio & Chiropractic

How Physio Helps Arthritis

Physio helps manage arthritis in all areas of arthritis management. This means that physiotherapy for arthritis will help you to manage your arthritis symptoms with exercise, pain relief, and also through education about managing arthritis long-term.

Modify The Modifiable And Don’t Worry About The Unmodifiable

Physios use a wide range of therapies or what is called an integrated approach because there is no one therapy for everyone, but treatment is usually a combination of things to help and manage arthritis – such as progressive exercise therapy, hands-on therapy, joint traction, and spinal decompression, and laser therapy.

Physio For Arthritis Dublin Physio & Chiropractic

Physio Can Help Relief Pain

People who suffer from arthritis can have multiple limitations that impact how they carry out their everyday tasks. Some of the limitations that physios can help relieve for those suffering from arthritis include:

  • Joint pain.
  • Joint stiffness.
  • Swelling.
  • Reduced range of motion.
  • Loss of function.
  • Difficulty walking.
  • Difficulty carrying out everyday tasks.
  • Difficulty sleeping.

If you are suffering from any of these limitations it might be a good idea to contact a physiotherapist that can help relieve these symptoms for better health and wellness and quality of life.

How Exercise Therapy Helps Arthritis

Exercise therapy is a great way to help reduce symptoms associated with arthritis. Your physiotherapist will design a very specific exercise program with your unique goals, needs, and impairments in mind.

Physio Exercise For Arthritis Dublin Physio & Chiropractic

Your physiotherapist will gradually progress your exercise program to include more exercise and increase the intensity so your body is challenged just the right amount to facilitate positive change, for example, gains in strength, balance, coordination, and endurance.

How Hands-on Therapy Helps Arthritis

Physiotherapists use a combination of hands-on therapies such as joint mobilizations (or ‘mobs’ as we like to call them), and massage therapy or muscle release techniques to improve function by reducing pain and limitations in range of motion, or stiffness. Hands-on therapies can also be used to relax tight muscles and relieve tension.

When it comes to arthritis physiotherapists use hands-on techniques to reduce pain and stiffness in the affected joint – be it the knee, hip, wrist, or spine.

How Laser Therapy Helps Arthritis

Laser therapy is a very effective tool when to comes to reducing symptoms and managing arthritis, and it is not utilized as much as it could be. Laser therapy works on cellular to help arthritis sufferers reduce pain and stiffness, while also promoting tissue healing.

It is a non-invasive treatment that uses red laser therapy to stimulate the cells in your body which then leads to increased blood flow around the area being treated – helping with inflammation and reducing pain.

Hands-on therapy for arthritis dublin physio & chiropractic

This means you get fast results from this therapy so it’s great for arthritis sufferers who are looking for quick pain relief.

Physio Treatment For Arthritis

Physio treatment starts with a thorough client history, we gather your story related to the problem.

Then, we do an examination to determine what might we like to work on in treatment and what we can improve. After a thorough examination, your physio will start treatment to help reduce symptoms and promote wellness.

Your physio will work with you over a series of treatments to help improve your:

Symptoms and pain levels (inflammation).

– Function, balance, coordination, and endurance.

These elements are often lost in arthritis sufferers because of the arthritis symptoms present – such as joint stiffness or swelling that limits movement ability.

Balance Physio For Arthritis Dublin Physio & Chiropractic

We will work with you to help reduce arthritis symptoms that are impacting your ability to carry out tasks, improve function, and manage arthritis. We can also help you develop an exercise program at home so you can stay on track for wellness between physio visits.

If you want more information about arthritis treatment or how physio might be able to help arthritis sufferers, contact your local physio today to book an appointment.

We hope this blog has helped answer the question “can physiotherapy help arthritis?”.

Conclusion

Yes – physio can help arthritis in many ways, by reducing symptoms, managing flare-ups, improving mobility and function, and in turn, improving quality of life for those living with arthritis. The key things to take from this blog is – physio is tailored to you, movement is key, and don’t worry about what is out of your control.

Physio Can Help Arthritis Dublin Physio & Chiropractic

References 

[1] https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/treatment/complementary-therapies/physical-therapies/physical-therapy-for-arthritis

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4756025/